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Manx LitFest 2015

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I was super excited to be invited over to the Isle of Man this month, to take part in this year’s Manx LitFest.

I’ve visited the Isle of Man just once before, when I was only about 8 years old. I don’t remember very much from that trip, except for the ferry crossing over from Heysham, saying ‘hello’ to the fairies while going over the Isle of Man’s famous ‘fairy bridge’ and er… making friends with a nice dog on a beach.

This time, however, I flew over to the island on Thursday afternoon to find the Isle of Man was looking spectacular in the beautiful September sunshine. My first port of call on arrival was a reception to launch the Manx LitFest, at the Noa Bakehouse in Douglas – complete with local Isle of Man beer, and the bakery’s own freshly-baked sourdough bread.

At the launch, I had the chance to meet some fellow authors and illustrators, as well as some of the festival’s organisers, who were lovely. The Manx LitFest only started a few years ago, and it has such a friendly atmosphere – it is obviously a real community effort, with lots of people getting involved to help make it a success.

The launch was followed by a book-themed quiz – the hotly-contested annual Book Fanatics Quiz Night. The authors and illustrators taking part in the festival took on the role of quizmasters for the occasion – and my round, appropriately enough, was Enid Blyton themed!

After a great evening of quizzing it was back to the hotel, situated on the promenade in Douglas. The Isle of Man was a popular holiday destination in the Victorian era, and the Douglas sea-front is lined with beautiful old buildings that were once boarding houses. Now it has a kind of faded grandeur that is hugely appealing – even our hotel, The Regency, had lots of old-fashioned charm, including a tiny, very old-school lift.

Douglas promenade #ManxLitfest

A photo posted by Katherine Woodfine (@followtheyellow) on

Friday brought a full day of events in Isle of Man schools, as part of the Lit Fest’s Schools Day. My lovely festival volunteer Kirsty took me on a tour of the island, visiting three different primary schools – Victoria Road School, Arbory School and Peel Clothwoker’s School. At each school I had the chance to meet lots of enthusiastic young readers – from Year 3 up to Year 6 – and to tell them about The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow. We also had a lot of fun coming up with our own ideas for mystery stories – including creating some incredibly imaginative heroes and villains.

Poster in Arbory School

Poster in Arbory School!

With Year 6 at Peel Clothworker's School

With Year 6 at Peel Clothworker’s School

Talking to Years 3 & 4 at Arbory Road School - photo by Manx Lit Fest

Talking to Years 3 & 4 at Arbory Road School – photo by Manx Lit Fest

Doing four school sessions in a day was intense but luckily Kirsty knew exactly when it was time to stop off for an emergency ice-cream break!

 

Author’s reward in sunny Peel #ManxLitfest #latergram

 

A photo posted by Katherine Woodfine (@followtheyellow) on

On Saturday there was time for a traditional breakfast of Manx kippers before I set out to Ramsay to Mooragh Park for the festival’s Family Day – which this year was Famous Five and Secret Seven themed With a detective trail to follow, puzzles to solve, Blyton-themed craft activities and even its very own ‘Kirrin Island’ it couldn’t have been much more up my street!

At the Famous Five & Secret Seven Family Day

At the Famous Five & Secret Seven Family Day

I was due to give a short reading from The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow, as well as signing books at the pop-up bookshop, run by the wonderful Bridge Bookshop from Port Erin. As usual though I couldn’t resist getting a bit more involved and ended up doing a ‘secret agent fingerprinting’ activity with kids, and then revisiting my bookselling days helping out in the bookshop. It was great to see lots of the children that I had met in schools the day before coming back with their families to join in the fun.

Helping out at the pop up bookshop!

At the pop-up bookshop!

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Reading at the family day! Photo via Manx Lit Fest

Sunday was my final day in the Isle of Man – and happily there was time for a final long stroll along the beautiful Douglas sea-front in the sunshine, before heading to the airport.

I had such a wonderful time on the Isle of Man – many thanks to the entire Manx Lit Fest team for a really fantastic weekend!

At the Edinburgh Festival

The Edinburgh International Book Festival has been a firm fixture in my diary over the last few years. August just wouldn’t be August without some sunny (or more likely, cold and rainy!) days in Charlotte Square. Edinburgh is one of my favourite cities, and the festival is always great fun – I’ve so enjoyed the chance to visit each year, when the various Children’s Laureates have been appearing as part of the Book Festival programme.

So this year, I couldn’t have been more delighted to be appearing at the Book Festival as an author myself! On Saturday, I joined fellow debut author Gabrielle Kent for an event entitled Crime Solvers and Mystery Keepers, as part of the children’s programme.

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Photo by Gabrielle’s husband Satish aka @asianastroboy

It was lovely to meet Gabrielle and have the chance to chat to her – I really enjoyed her book, Alfie Bloom and the Secret of Hexbridge Castle, published by Scholastic.

This is the story of young hero Alfie Bloom, whose life changes dramatically when he inherits a mysterious old castle concealing some strange (and dangerous) secrets. A shape-shifting solicitor, an enigmatic butler, a flying bearskin rug and a pair of truly horrible villains all appear in this very entertaining magical adventure.

Alfie and his gang of friends have a Famous Five vibe that I really like – so it was no surprise to discover at the event that Gabrielle is a fellow Blyton fan! Her day job is lecturing in computer game design, and it was really interesting to hear about how this influences her writing – she talked about how she envisioned certain scenes in the book being like a level in a computer game.

We had a really great time chatting on stage, chaired by the brilliant Lindsey Fraser, who gave the children in the audience the chance to ask us lots of questions. We talked about everything from writing tips to whether we’d like our books to be made into films (a resounding YES PLEASE!) to Harry Potter.

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Photo by @asianastroboy

Afterwards we signed books in the festival bookshop where we got to meet lots of the children who came along.

KWGKsigning

Photo by @kwebberwrites

I also had chance to pay a quick visit to Waterstones on George Street where I was pleased to espy The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow on display!

#ClockworkSparrow at Waterstones on George St

A photo posted by Katherine Woodfine (@followtheyellow) on

Needless to say there was time for lots of other Edinburgh treats and fun times – including going to amazing vintage ice-cream parlour Mary’s Milk Bar and visits to Peter’s Yard to eat lots of BUNS  – a definite Edinburgh essential.

Thanks so much for a wonderful weekend Edinburgh Book Festival – hope to see you again next year!

A Midsummer Mystery and some Lancashire fun

A Midsummer Mystery

Last weekend, I headed to my home county of Lancashire for some Clockwork Sparrow themed events as part of Independent Booksellers Week.

First up on Sunday was the fantastic A Midsummer Mystery, in the lovely St-Annes-on-Sea. The event was organised by fabulous independent bookshop Storytellers Inc and took place in a suitably mysterious venue.

I was joined at the event by four amazing children’s authors, and fellow Mystery Girls Robin Stevens, Helen Moss, Kate Pankhurst and Elen Caldecott – the Famous Five, if you will.

We each talked about our mystery themed-books and (in between bunbreaks in the Green Room) took part in a mystery of our own. We were all suspects in The Case of the Missing Manuscript, and had to be questioned by the Inspector about the strange disappearance of the latest crime novel manuscript from the study of famous local author Davinia Carruthers-Henley.

The young audience were responsible for working out which of us was the culprit. Elen and Kate were early suspects but in the final denoument it was revealed that none other than Robin was in fact the dastardly villain behind it all! (Although her crime proved to be fairly forgivable, as she didn’t really want to steal the book – just read it before anyone else…)

Having a laugh with Kate Pankhurst and Helen Moss - photo by Robin.

Having a laugh with Kate Pankhurst and Helen Moss in the Green Room – photo by Robin.

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Robin got the children to come up with their own mysteries – so of course The Mystery Girls got in on the action from the Green Room.

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Kate Pankhurst drew our cover

We even made the local paper!

We even made the local paper!

The Mystery Girls!

The Mystery Girls!

Kate also drew an amazing illustration for each of the author’s event – here’s her take on Sinclair’s:

For lots more about A Midsummer Mystery, check out Luna’s Little Library’s brilliant Storify of the event here.

The next day, I headed back to St Annes for a day of events with Storytellers Inc. In the morning, Robin and I headed to nearby Heyhouses School for my first ever school event! Naturally, it started with a disco…

Robin all ready to get mysterious!

Robin all ready to get mysterious!

Love this picture of James reading along with Clockwork Sparrow (courtesy of Robin's website)

Love this picture of James reading along with Clockwork Sparrow – photo by Robin

In the afternoon there was time for a quick walk on the beach before it we headed back to Storytellers Inc some book signing and two sessions with a local Cub Scout group – I really loved talking to them about all their favourite books.

St Annes

Lovely St Annes beach

Amazing Clockwork Sparrow themed display at Storytellers Inc

Amazing Clockwork Sparrow themed display at Storytellers Inc

Tuesday was quite a special day – I went back to my own old primary school, Abbey Village Primary, for a school event organised by another fantastic Lancashire indie – Ebb & Flo in Chorley.

It was amazing, if a tiny bit surreal, to be back in my old school, and talk to pupils.  I loved books, reading and writing when I was at primary school, but we never had an author visit. Abbey Village is a little school in a small Lancashire village, and the most exciting book-related occasion was when the mobile library visited us once every few weeks! For that reason, it felt extra special to meet a new generation of Abbey Village pupils and talk to them about books and writing. Who knows whether some of them might be children’s authors and illustrators of the future?

Super happy to be back at Abbey Village School!

Super happy to be back at Abbey Village School!

In the afternoon we headed back to Ebb & Flo to sign some books, and then we went on to nearby Adlington Primary School for another school session. It was so lovely to meet children in all the schools I visited and I was super impressed by their enthusiasm for reading and their knowledge of lots of  books.

Finally we finished the trip with what else but tea and cakes in a gorgeous vintage tea room?

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The Old Stables Vintage Tea Shop in Chorley

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The perfect finale to our mini Lancashire tour!

I came back with a whole haul of gorgeous purchases from two fantastic Lancashire indies, and some lovely gifts from them too (including, of course, some Chorley cakes!)

Thanks so much to Storytellers Inc and Ebb & Flo for organising such fabulous events – I hope to come and visit you again soon!

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Hay Fever

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On stage with Robin Stevens at Hay Festival

 

I have great memories of visiting Hay-on-Wye as a child. What could be better than a place that describes itself as a ‘town of books’? But although I’d visited previously, and enjoyed rummaging through the bookshops for treasures, and exploring the glorious countryside, I’d never actually been to Hay Festival before.

This weekend I was lucky enough to do just that. I headed to Hay for  a brilliant weekend of book events – including chairing a fantastic line-up of YA authors, and doing my first ever author event for The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow!

First up on Saturday afternoon, was chairing an event with lovely author Maggie Harcourt and the fantastic The Bookshop Band, who’ve written two new songs inspired by her book The Last Summer of Us.

I also spotted The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow in the Festival bookshop – the first time I’d ever seen it on a bookshop shelf.

On Sunday I was chairing an event with US YA superstar Sarah J Maas, author of the Throne of Glass series. We talked about her new book, A Court of Thorns and Roses (and the Disney film of Beauty and the Beast, in some detail) with an audience of over 200 people.

That evening, I was back to chair two YA debut authors – Melinda Salisbury and Catherine Doyle. (You know it’s a great event when one of your authors is wearing horns!)

Then on Monday it was author time! Even though I felt cool as a cucumber about chairing other authors’ events, I was suddenly really nervous when it came to talking about my own book for the very first time. I was so glad to have fellow Mystery Girl Robin Stevens beside me for the event.

Before we went on stage, I signed my first ever book (for George!) in the Hay Festival Green Room.

Katherine signs her very first book – lucky George! #hayfestival #clockworksparrow

A photo posted by Robin Stevens (@redbreastedbird) on

Then came our event, on the beautiful Starlight Stage. Happily we had lots of friendly faces in the audience. We each talked about our books, and read a few pages (the first time I’ve ever read from The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow!) before interviewing each other. We discussed mysteries, the books that had inspired us, all things detective… and of course BUNBREAKS. Robin also talked  about Gunpowder, Murder & Plot the fourth Murder Most Unladylike Mystery set to be published in spring 2016 – and there were audible gasps from the audience when she revealed that the book would involve the death of the new Head Girl!

I was so chuffed to see that we had lots of questions from the audience too – and after the event, lots of people came along to the book signing in the Festival Bookshop. It was fantastic to see the lovely Michelle from Tales of Yesterday who took loads of great photos.

A few more favourite pictures from Twitter…

After all the excitement, I went along to one of Malorie Blackman’s two final Children’s Laureate events. The Love Hurts panel discussion was a brilliant discussion between Malorie, James Dawson, Non Pratt and YA Prize winner Louise O’Neill about writing YA.

@jamesbooks @malorieblackman with Louise O’ Neill, Non Pratt and Jonathan Douglas #hayfestival

A photo posted by Claire Shanahan (@clairemshanahan) on

Thanks so much Hay Festival – I had a fantastic time, and couldn’t have hoped for a better place for my first ever author event!

A bunch of Hay Festival roses - one is given to each speaker at the end of each event!

A bunch of Hay Festival roses – one is given to each speaker at the end of each event!

Dispatches from the Bologna Book Fair

Fiera del Libro 2015 - Bologna

Last week I headed to the Bologna Children’s Book Fair for a very special gathering of Children’s Laureates from around the globe.

The UK Children’s Laureate was the first such post anywhere in the world, but since it began in 1999, many other countries have set up similar positions, whether they are called a ‘Children’s Laureate’ or a ‘Reading Ambassador’.

Following a meeting of the Swedish, Irish and Australian Laureates in Bologna two years ago, it was decided to bring as many of the Laureates from around the world together for an ‘international Laureate summit’ at the Bologna Book Fair in 2015 – so I was off to the Fair with Children’s Laureate Malorie Blackman!

It was my first visit to Bologna, and I was excited to see what the Fair is like. The event is very much aimed at children’s publishing professionals: it’s a place where authors, illustrators, literary agents, licensors, packagers, distributors, printers and booksellers all come together to buy and sell rights to children’s books and properties, learn  about new developments and trends, network and find new business opportunities.

Here’s my Bologna Book Fair diary from the trip:

Day 1: Sunday

My flight out was at an ungodly hour on Sunday morning: on arrival, I had time for a very a quick look at the beautiful historic centre (and to say hello to Malorie who was staying near the Piazza Maggiore) before checking into my hotel near the Fair.

Even though the Fair didn’t officially open until the next day, we had our first Laureate event that afternoon. After a bit of a confusing time trying to navigate the site, where set-up was underway, I found my way to the room where our event was taking place, where Malorie and several of the other Laureates from Australia, Ireland, Finland and Sweden had already gathered, along with their teams.

The first event was a private meeting, designed to give everyone the chance to get to know each other. Julia Eccleshare, children’s books editor for the Guardian and stalwart of the UK Children’s Laureate Steering Group, facilitated a roundtable discussion in which each Laureate had the chance to introduce themselves, and to talk about their work. The group also discussed their aims for the summit and what we all hoped to get out of the next few days.

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Laureates hard at work!

That evening I attended my first Bologna party, given by Penguin Random House USA, where I also drank my first glass of Prosecco for the trip  – a Bologna essential!

Next up was dinner with the Children’s Laureates and their teams – it was great to have the chance to talk to people who do similar work in organisations from all around the world. While we were there, the two Welsh Laureates arrived to join us – Anierin Caradog who is the Bardd Plant Cymru, and Martin Daws, who is the Welsh Young People’s Laureate. After much pasta (seriously, more pasta than I would ever have thought possible to consume in a single sitting) we all headed back to our hotels for a much needed rest ahead of Day 2!

 

Day 2: Monday

To the Book Fair! I headed for the main entrance, where the first thing that caught my eye was this amazing Alice in Wonderland carpet.

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Our next Laureate session was an invite-only event aimed at organisations from other countries that were interested in learning more about the Children’s Laureate initiatives, and in gaining useful information that might even help them set up a Laureate programme of their own. Representatives from countries including Italy and New Zealand, attended to hear more about the Children’s Laureate, including how the schemes work on a more practical level. Building on the discussions the previous day, the Laureates also had chance to talk in depth about what they wanted to get out of the summit, and possible ways to work together in future.

After the event, Malorie and I spent some time exploring the Book Fair. There was so much to see: we visited some publisher stands including the Barrington Stoke stand where Malorie received a rousing welcome and we embarrassed her by making her pose by her name for this picture.

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Next it was on to the very large and impressive Penguin Random House stand where Malorie was introduced to author Sophie Kinsella, whose first young adult book Finding Audrey is published this year, as well as fitting in a quick photo and interview for Publishers Weekly.

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There was plenty more time for exploring in the afternoon. I visited colleagues from Ireland on the Children’s Books Ireland stand, and from Australia on the Australian Children’s Literature Alliance stand where Australian Laureate Jackie French was chatting to visitors, and Ann James was demonstrating the mud painting techniques she used in her book I’m a Dirty Dinosaur. Justine from ACLA showed me a lovely animated version of the same book, with Ann reading aloud: this is part of the StoryBox Library project, which is designed to allow Australian children the chance to hear stories told in Australian voices.

There were so many publisher stands to browse. As well as all the familiar English language publishers, there was also a host of international stands to explore from publishers I was completely unfamiliar with. It was a great way to get a snapshot of the global publishing industry, and I enjoyed taking in everything from unusual European illustrations, to beautiful papercraft from Asia – not to mention spotting characters such as Miffy, Peppa Pig and Pikachu wandering around.

Obviously it was also essential to stop for a brief gelato break in the sunshine!

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Most of all, I enjoyed looking at the  incredible illustration exhibitions including an exhibition of work by illustrators from this year’s Guest country, Croatia; a display of ‘silent books’ (wordless picture books); and of course, the famous Bologna Illustrators Exhibition which displays the best new illustration work from around the world. I could have spent hours looking at all the lovely work on display, and it was only the fact that my suitcase was already full to bursting that stopped me immediately buying a copy of the exhibition catalogue to take back home!

I also loved looking at the Illustrators’ Walls –  Bologna’s unofficial exhibition spaces. Lots of illustrators come to Bologna each year, from established children’s illustrators to students and aspiring illustrators, and many of them add their leaflets, posters and postcards to the Illustrators’ Wall, which gradually becomes more and more crowded with work, forming a sort of ever-evolving collage.

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After an afternoon of enjoyable exploring, I met my Down the Rabbit Hole co-host Melissa and her colleague Florentyna at the Macmillan Children’s Book stand, where they were celebrating two new books from Meg Cabot. We hopped on the free bus into Bologna town centre, where Melissa took Florentyna and I on a tour of some of Bologna’s bookshops, including a fabulous children’s bookshop in a converted church, and the wonderful Ambasciatori librerie.coop – part bookshop, part trattoria, where books were sold alongside wine and all sorts of delicious food – basically, the perfect combination!

Our next stop was a reception being held by Scholastic at the Palazzo Re Enzo – a glorious old building on the Piazza Nettuno, where the guests were entertained by a fantastic speech about reading for pleasure from Captain Underpants creator Dav Pilkey. We went on to join some of the Scholastic team for a special dinner for Axel Scheffler, and after many courses (including even more pasta) we headed to the Swine Bar for what else but a glass of Prosecco to round off an excellent day.

Day 3: Tuesday

After breakfast in the hotel, I headed back to the Fair to catch up with the lovely Kristen Harrison from Curved House Kids.

We took in a couple of events from the Fair’s seminar programme: first up, a session about children’s books in translation, followed by a presentation of a new cultural app for kids, Art Stories, at the Digital Cafe. After a quick panino in the sunny courtyard, it was on to the announcement of the prestigious Astrid Lindgren Award. This year the Award was given to South African reading organisation PRAESA and it was fascinating to hear about some of their work.

In the afternoon it was time for our third and final Laureate event – a public session bringing together all of the Laureates at the Authors Cafe. We were joined for this session by the newly-arrived Mexican and Dutch laureates, giving us a grand total of 10 Laureates in all! The event, which was once again chaired by Julia Eccleshare, was a fantastic celebration of reading promotion around the world, including a Welsh song from Anierin, and a spot of performance (with audience participation) from Martin. Afterwards it was time for the all-important group photo.

After the event, Children’s Books Ireland held a reception on their stand. I head back into town to join Egmont’s party at Le Staze. It was great to meet some of the Egmont team before heading to join Malorie at a dinner for Frank Cottrell Boyce, given by Macmillan Children’s Books to celebrate his new book The Astounding Broccoli Boy.

Day 4: Wednesday

After packing up and checking out of the hotel, there was just enough time for a final visit to the Fair. I wanted to spend some more time looking at the exhibitions, but also to visit the amazing Fair Bookshop.  I could easily have spent a fortune in there, especially on the heart-stoppingly beautiful array of picture books from all around the world!

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I said goodbye to some of my Laureate colleagues and had the chance to chat about the next steps for our international work: we’re all excited to continue the conversations that started in our meetings, and to reconvene in Bologna again in two years’ time for our next ‘summit’. I also popped along to the Egmont stand where I spotted a proof of The Mystery of the Clockwork Sparrow!  And last of all there was time to squeeze in a final gelato before heading to the airport.

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Arreverdeci Bologna – you were marvellous! I hope I’ll be back again next year.